How to Approach “Trophy” Stillwater Fisheries

We are blessed with a huge number of what would be considered trophy stillwater fisheries in the interior of BC.  Lakes that hold some of the biggest triploid rainbow trout in the province, fish that will push well over the thirty-inch mark.  Is it difficult? Of course, they grow to these sizes for a reason.

These lakes are a test, they can be mentally draining if you approach them with the wrong mindset.  Do no push your boat into a trophy lake with the idea that you are guaranteed to have lights-out action the whole day.  Mindset is everything, accept the fact that you might come away empty handed and that’s okay.  I couldn’t even count the number of times I have been totally blanked by lakes like this without even an interaction with a single fish over an 8+ hour period. read more

Fall Spey Fishing Course – Fraser River – November 9-11, 2018

We have added a great package for those looking to get into or further their knowledge in fishing two handed fly rods.  This course is done on the water, and includes three full days of guided fishing on both the Fraser & Harrison rivers with Oliver Rutschmann of Oliver’s Sportfishing Adventures.  We have 4 spots available, all of the info can be found on our Hosted Trips page right here!

White Beads: When & Why You Should Fish Them

White beads, often referred to as snow cone or ice cream cone patterns, can really play a big part in the Stillwater chironomid game.  Here’s a few things to consider when using white beads.

Water Clarity:  The big advantage to white beads is that they stand out and can help fish locate them in murky water.  Often fishing tannin, or “tea coloured” water white beads will really shine.  Another great application for chironomids with white beads is during an algae bloom, as traditional pupa tied with yarn gills can grab clippings of algae on their way down the water column.  On the other hand, I will rarely ever fish a white bead in gin-clear water. read more

Five Applications for Intermediate Sinking Fly Lines

Clear intermediate sinking, or “slime lines” are an extremely versatile fly line that I believe don’t receive the recognition they deserve.  What these lines are is a full sinking line that simply falls at a very controlled rate of 0.5-2 inches per second.  They don’t hang up in shallow water, they’re very useful in fishing sub-surface and best of all they’re totally clear.  Here’s my 5 favourite applications:

1)      Scuds & Ledges – Freshwater shrimp are a huge part of a trout’s diet, they are the Big Mac of the underwater world and there’s a reason that lakes holding massive rainbows will typically have a large scud population.  What I will do with my clear intermediate line is find a ledge or a dropoff and anchor parallel to it.  If I can’t visually distinguish it, I’ll use my depth sounder to tell me right where the transition is.  From here, I will cast along the drop off or slightly over it onto the deep side.  With a quite erratic twitch retrieve I will bring the shrimp back to the boat with the occasional pause to allow my fly to fall.  Takes are usually quite savage. read more

VIDEO: YETI Presents -120 Days

This video is more than just a fly fishing video to me, it showcases the pure obsession behind it, along with some real-time guide frustration.  I have not listened to someone talk more passionately about their craft than David Mangum does in this video.  I have watched it a million times and still never gets old to me, so if you are out of things to do on this Friday night sit back and enjoy this!

Six Reasons Stillwater Fly Fishing is Really Great

It’s February 1, and I’m sure I’m not the only one sitting here wondering when the first of the low-elevation lakes will begin to lose the ice that has kept us off of them all winter.  I know it won’t be for at least 45 days, so for the time being all we can do is dream.  Here are a few of my favourite things about our interior stillwater fishery.

Swinging Flesh Flies – Winter Trout Fishing

Each fall, many of our rivers in the interior of BC see healthy runs of Sockeye & Chinook salmon that make the journey from the ocean to their home river to spawn and eventually die.  This not only provides a huge amount of nutrients to our rivers, but also the resident and adfluvial trout and char that reside in these waters.

*New* Intro to Chironomid Fishing Course – Trout Waters Fly & Tackle – Thursday, March 15

With our March 10th “Intro to Chironomid Fishing Course” being sold out, we’ve added another date at Trout Waters Fly & Tackle in Kelowna, BC on Thursday, March 15th!  This will be an evening course, running from 6-9pm.  This date is also expected to sell out quickly, click here to reserve your spot now.

Chironomid fishing is an incredibly productive form of Stillwater fly fishing.  Though they are small, chironomids make up a huge part of a trout’s diet through the open water season.  This course is a 3 hour indoor presentation that will cover the following: read more

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