White Beads: When & Why You Should Fish Them

White beads, often referred to as snow cone or ice cream cone patterns, can really play a big part in the Stillwater chironomid game.  Here’s a few things to consider when using white beads.

Water Clarity:  The big advantage to white beads is that they stand out and can help fish locate them in murky water.  Often fishing tannin, or “tea coloured” water white beads will really shine.  Another great application for chironomids with white beads is during an algae bloom, as traditional pupa tied with yarn gills can grab clippings of algae on their way down the water column.  On the other hand, I will rarely ever fish a white bead in gin-clear water. read more

Swinging Flesh Flies – Winter Trout Fishing

Each fall, many of our rivers in the interior of BC see healthy runs of Sockeye & Chinook salmon that make the journey from the ocean to their home river to spawn and eventually die.  This not only provides a huge amount of nutrients to our rivers, but also the resident and adfluvial trout and char that reside in these waters.

*New* Intro to Chironomid Fishing Course – Trout Waters Fly & Tackle – Thursday, March 15

With our March 10th “Intro to Chironomid Fishing Course” being sold out, we’ve added another date at Trout Waters Fly & Tackle in Kelowna, BC on Thursday, March 15th!  This will be an evening course, running from 6-9pm.  This date is also expected to sell out quickly, click here to reserve your spot now.

Chironomid fishing is an incredibly productive form of Stillwater fly fishing.  Though they are small, chironomids make up a huge part of a trout’s diet through the open water season.  This course is a 3 hour indoor presentation that will cover the following: read more

Intro to Chironomid Fishing Course – Michael & Young Fly Shop Saturday, March 24

We are excited to announce two “Intro to Chironomid Fishing” courses at both of Micheal & Young Fly Shop’s locations (Surrey & Vancouver) on Saturday, March 24th.

3 Reasons Blob Flies Are Great

The first time someone gave me a “blob” pattern to try I didn’t know if I should put it on the end of my line or in the garbage.  What on earth could possibly drive a fish that lives solely on insects to eat this strange ball of bright material?  It still puzzles me how a fly that is so simple can prove so effective year after year.  Here are three reasons you should always keep your blob box handy:

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